« MoveOn.org nonsense on Social Security | Main | The public vs. the spinners on Social Security »

February 13, 2005

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d83451d25c69e200d83474e2aa69e2

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference What is waterboarding? (part II):

Comments

if we are talking about pyschological trauma, both techniques may in fact cause the same long-term results, so the concern to discern the definition doesn't really seem so important.

I've written a more detailed description of waterboarding here. I've also tried a bit of it on myself this weekend. It's every bit as horrible as it's described, and the cloth makes it worse in my experience.

http://tongodeon.livejournal.com/535961.html

I'm planning a public waterboarding of consenting participants on the west coast in the near future. If you'd like to find out what it's like, you are invited to attend.

I think performing a public waterboarding
will be a great anti-war statement. All the better if the participants are arrested for disorderly conduct or some such charge,
as it will shine an ever sharper spotlight
on the illegality of Bush's torture chambers.

Waterboarding is a wonderful way to gain information to protect your freedom to be so naieve. If I remember right, the 9-11 terrorists didn't care about all of the people who were literally burned to death. I believe if it can be used to protect us from another incident such as 9-11, then go for it! It's funny how you will stand up for the protection of terrorists, but knock those of us who stand up to protect you and your freedoms. "Turn the other cheek, and soon you are left covered in bruises." No thanks, I'll fight back. So walk along your sheepish cowardly way, but stand out of the way of the Sheepdogs who are willing to protect you, and let us do our job!

If waterboarding terrorists saved one American life in this century, without shame or guilt, I say, "Fill up the pool and buckle up".

The comments to this entry are closed.