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December 31, 2007

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Does Russert even know what "strict constructionist" means?

No. Maybe he wishes his phone had rung so someone could explain it to him--or at the very least give him enough talking phrases to make it through his dreadful show. Alas, that never happened.

It really is vintage Russert--who btw received the dubious benefit of a legal education at Cleveland-Marshall College of Law at Cleveland State University. Russert displays not so much thought as the simulacrum of thought, asserting conflict and inconsistency where none exists.

For a look into the shallowness of Russert's intellect, all you need to do is wade through Big Russ and Me," his autobiography disingenuously cast as a tribute to his father. I feel certain that he titled it Big Russ and Me because his publisher recommended against simply naming it Me.

FWIW, there are a few parts of the Constitution that are not amendable. The rules regarding slavery were not amendable before 1808, and each state has an unamendable right to equal representation in the Senate.

But these exceptions are very narrowly delineated in Article V. Otherwise, the Constitution was designed for amendment.

"Russert displays not so much thought as the simulacrum of thought, asserting conflict and inconsistency where none exists."

So true. He plays a game of gotcha that is not really concerned with the interviewee's principles, positions, or any other substantive issue. Sidestep the question, and Russert moves on to the next gotcha attempt and the media applaud the exercise in political jujitsu.

I much prefer the style of Stephanopoulos. He seems much more concerned with substance and capable of dealing with real issues.

and each state has an unamendable right to equal representation in the Senate.

Technically, that could be amended if every state voted for it (the section reads "no State, without its Consent, shall be deprived of its equal Suffrage in the Senate," indicating that states could be deprived if they so consented) although any new states would likely also have to vote to maintain the amendment upon entry for it to remain valid.

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